Our Story

Who we are at heart

The ministries and discipleship at Goodrich remain centered around community. From our Community Care Closet, that provides much needed hygiene and household essentials to our neighbors, to community events like our annual Fall Festival, we are rooted in life connected to one another. We love partnering with other area organizations through events and shared missions. Our Sunday School classes and ministry groups become like families, as we do life together and support one another through all our shared joys and sorrows. Community is who we are at heart.

Our future unfolds

A tradition of growth through challenges is one that is deeply embedded in our church. While many churches have struggled through the Covid pandemic, Goodrich has found a way to see this challenge as a way to live into God's calling in the world. We have used this moment to lean into new possibilities for ministry in the digital world, while staying faithful to our identity as a community church. God is at work and continues to call us into ministry, and it is our heart to follow with hope, grace, and courage.

our History

In 1942, a new work in faith, funded primarily by Dr. and Mrs. Hugh (Emma) Goodrich, began in what was then northwest Norman. The Goodrich Methodist Church began with 21 charter members (many from McFarlin Methodist's congregation), with a building at the southwest corner of North Porter and Frank Street.  In 1956, the church moved to a new building at 200 West Hayes.
 
A fire engulfed the church building on December 23, 1986, destroying the sanctuary, classrooms, and offices. Along with the building went pianos, the organ, choir robes, hymnals, church records, and so much more.
 
That year’s Christmas Eve service was accomplished through the help and support of various churches in the community.  The service was moved into Goodrich’s Fellowship Hall, a cinder block building across the street.  Pulled from the rubble that night were the altar and candlesticks. Chairs were lent by St. Stephen’s United Methodist Church, and a Baptist church lent hymnals. Despite the nearly total damage the night before, the Christmas Eve service went on as planned, and Jesus Christ was born!  
 
During the reconstruction process, worship continued in the Fellowship Hall.  The old metal cross from the sanctuary was salvaged, cleaned, and served as a link to the past.  Needlepoint pads from the altar kneelers became treasured art in the rebuilt Sanctuary. Burn marks can be seen on them today.

Be a part of our story...

Join us every Sunday as we gather to worship together a 9:00 am and 11 am.